About Belvoir

Belvoir, meaning beautiful view in French, dates back to Norman times. The English pronunciation 'Beaver' was built up over many centuries through the inability of Anglo-Saxons to master the French tongue.

Belvoir has been the ancestral home of the Manners family for five hundred years and is currently the family home of the 11th Duke and Duchess and their five children. The present Castle is the fourth to have stood on the site since Norman times. The existing Castle was completed in the early 19th century after previous buildings suffered complete or partial destruction during the Wars of the Roses, the Civil War and a major fire in 1816.

From the elegance of the Elizabeth Saloon and the majesty of the State Dining Room to the delights of the Regents Gallery and the military splendour of the Guard Room, Belvoir possesses one of the most stunning interiors of the period.

In contrast to the grandeur of the State Rooms, the Old Kitchen and Bakery fuel the imagination of 'below the stairs' life in 1825, while the School Room and Nursery allow children to experience games from Regency times.

The Castle contains many notable pieces of art and includes paintings by Gainsborough, Reynolds, Holbein and Poussin. It houses outstanding collections of furniture, porcelain, silks, tapestries, French furniture and Italian sculpture. Sculpture extends outside into the Rose and Statue Gardens which are elegantly laid out round a central fountain. The statue collection terraced into the hillside includes work by Caius Cibber - Sculptor to Charles II.